“Daylight Saving Time” ends

“Daylight Saving Time” ends this weekend which means that the clocks get turned back an hour on Sunday morning very early. If you forget to turn your clocks back then you will turn up to church an hour early!

Workers at Stonehenge busy moving stones back one hour.

Sunday 27th October 2019

At our Sunday meeting this week we welcome Angela Birkin who will be leading our thoughts in the fourth of our series reflecting on “The Eucharist – Communion with God who is Love. The Eucharist as a celebration of the
mystery of the Triune God who is Love and whom we recognise in each other.”

The readings for the service, in case you want to read them beforehand, are:
Genesis 18: 1-8, 1 Corinthians 11: 23-26, and Luke 24: 13-35

Everyone is welcome so do come and join us at 10:30am. Just a word of warning though, it is the Abbey Dash race this Sunday and so there will be road closures. You can read more about these on the AgeUK website.

All Hallows’ “Last Supper” Style Service

A blog post by our “reporter” Ramona:

This last Sunday (20/10/19) we at All Hallows had a “last supper” style service with a twist. We started as usual in the church space but instead of being seated facing the altar, we stood in a circle very similar to how we stand when receiving the Eucharist. Janet Lindley gave a mini-sermon and we had the confession.

After that, we made our way to the edible food-waste cafe, Rainbow Junktion, that is connected to All Hallows to gather in small groups of about 4/5. On our way into the cafe, we firstly all washed our hands in a symbolic, and also hygienic, gesture.

Firstly, we made the soda bread by sieving the flour, adding the milk and butter and mixing/kneading it into dough. The 2 children in my group loved this bit the most with Hannah making a heart shaped loaf with a smiley face and Aiden making a round loaf, also with a smiley face. They looked fantastic, as did everyone else’s. After that, we all prepared the veg by chopping it up into very small pieces. The children got involved, under constant supervision, and did an excellent job. We may have some budding future Nigella Lawsons and Jamie Olivers amongst our members. We all have Tim to thank for making our pans full of veg into a yummy stew.

Some people, both children and adults alike, either didn’t fancy preparing food or missed out due to lack of space in the cafe so some of those went and sat in the chapel for some quiet contemplation and/or reading and some went back into the church hall to make place mats for our meal. They were all made beautifully and very creative too.

While waiting for our meal, Heston gave thanks to God for the bread, wine (grape juice) and for us and our wonderful lives. We sang the Taize chant “Eat this bread, drink this cup” which then goes onto say “Come to us and never be hungry. Eat this bread, drink this cup, trust in Him and you will not thirst” which got quite comical at one point as we usually only sing it through twice but because the stew was taking a little longer than anticipated, we had to sing it about 5/6 times which even had Heston smiling about it. Irony, as I for one was very hungry.

The fabulous idea for this “service with a twist” came from our self-styled Wednesday group, “The Wednesday Wombats’. It consists of Alice Marwick, Anna Bland, Evie Russel-Cohen, Janet Lindley, Phil Gardner, Toby Parsons and Tim Burt.

Everyone enjoyed this “Eucharistic themed” service which was in the middle of the 6 services exploring the Eucharist All Hallows are currently running and sat very nicely alongside our Eucharist story.

I thought it was a good idea to quote some All Hallows regulars with their words of praise.

“My son (Aiden) and I really enjoyed today. Doing stuff together as a small group was really good and the prayers felt very meaningful as we all paused and came together as a big church. Yes please to doing this again”

“It was great indeed. So well organised and thought through and constantly interpersonal”

“It’s really amazing!’

“Yes, it was great”

As well as our regular faces, we welcomed a good few new ones too. A brill time was obviously had by all, from our youngest member, a mere few weeks old, to our most mature of 80+!
All there is left to say now is,
“Heston, when is the next one?”

Ramona


Click here to see more about this amazing celebration


If you would like to find out more about this series then please visit Phil Gardner’s site.

Sunday 20th October 2019 – The Eucharist (Part 3)

On Sunday 20th October we had the third in the Reflections on the Eucharist series entitled “The Open Table”. It’ was a slightly different service – we prepared and then shared a simple vegetarian meal together and our worship combined the preparation and eating of the meal with prayers and readings. There was also space for quiet reflection, and some creative activities.

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Reading:
Luke 14:12-24

Reflection by Janet:

Today we’ve been gathering, baking, cooking, decorating, moving tables and chairs, preparing to share a meal together. All very ordinary things, but our reading today reminds us of the extraordinary in the sharing of a meal together.

Our reading tells the story of a man hosting a feast. A wedding banquet. And he wants this to be an amazing celebration. The food is prepared. The table is set.

The invitations are sent out. To important guests. To close friends. Special guests for a special occasion. To fill the room for an amazing party.

But in our story, the people on the invite list send their replies and the worst thing happens – the answer is no, they’re not coming. They are too busy. They have their own things to attend to, their own concerns. They have their work, their businesses to run. They have family and a farm to look after.

But our host is not daunted. The party must go ahead. The room must be full – there is a wedding to celebrate. The table is ready.

So the servants are sent out, to gather people from the streets. The ordinary are the ones who show up, who fill the room, sit at the table, who make the party happen.

As with lots of stories from Jesus, this isn’t just about a couple celebrating their wedding. It is pointing us towards something else. The wedding feast is a picture of Gods kingdom, God’s world order.

This kingdom is the one that began with Jesus, is continuing to come into being now, and will ultimately be completed when Jesus returns, when God finishes his work of bringing about this God’s world order.

In the wedding feast, the servants went out to find everyone who would come. The exclusive guest list for the party was torn up. And this kingdom of God, like the wedding feast, it isn’t just for the VIPs or special friends. The invitation is for us all.

And now, today, as we share our meal together, we are reminding ourselves of this party that started with Jesus. Where everyone is on the guest list. Where we are all welcome. We are all are invited to sit at the table.

The question for us is what is our RSVP? Will we take our place at the table? Will we say yes? Will we say yes to the invitation?

Comments

“…really enjoyed today. doing stuff together as a small group was really good , and the prayers felt very meaningful as we all paused and came together as a big church”

“… a fantastic service this morning! … it was really meaningful and lovely!”


If you would like to find out more about this series then please visit Phil Gardner’s site.

This Week 21st – 27th October

October is Fair Trade Month
Mon 21 Oct 11am-3pm Rainbow Junktion Cafe
Tue 22 Oct @7:30-9pm Bible Study at church (0113 2297546 for further info)
Wed 23 Oct @12-2pm OWLS lunch
Wed 23 Oct @7:30pm Annual Peace Service The Banquet Hall, Leeds Civic Hall
Thu 24 Oct 11am-3pm Rainbow Junktion Cafe
Fri 25 Oct 11am-3pm Rainbow Junktion Cafe
Fri 25 Oct @11:30am Bible Study at church (0113 2297546 for further info)
Sun 27 Oct @10.30am Sunday morning worship – “Exploring the Eucharist“,  a series looking at the meaning and our experience of the Eucharist / Communion “Part 4 – Communion with God who is Love” with Rev Angela Birkin
Sun 27 Oct @4pm Sacred Wing choir rehearsal

See our calendar for more details of what is happening at All Hallows’

Sunday 20th October 2019

This Sunday is the third in the Reflections on the Eucharist series. It’ll be a slightly different service – we’ll be preparing and then sharing a simple vegetarian meal together. Our worship will combine the preparations and eating with prayers and readings. There’ll also be space for quiet reflection, and some creative activities (aimed at Kids Church, but open to all).

You don’t need to do anything in advance or bring any food – that’ll all be provided. Though if you have time you might want to look at The Feast of Life and Love, the mini-website for the Reflections on the Eucharist series.

Please do come on Sunday at 10:30am prepared for things to be a little different, and open to trying it out!

The whole service, including eating and tidying up, will last longer than normal – but not much different from if you stayed for refreshments on another Sunday. If you can only come for part of it, that’s of course fine, although it’d be great if we could all share the food we’ve made together.

Feel free to ask any questions in advance, and hope to see you on Sunday!

Sermon by Anna Bland 13th October 2019 – The Eucharist (Part 2)

Notes from the sermon by Anna Bland 13th October 2019 – The Eucharist (Part 2 – Kingdom Economics)

Readings:
Mark 6:30–44
1 Cor 11:17–26

Hello for those who don’t know me I am Anna.
I’ve been asked to talk to you about kingdom economics and the Eucharist. The symbol of self-giving love and a meal shared by friends on that fateful night which has resulted in two thousand years if us doing the same.
The gospel reading today is about a different meal shared by 5,000. Thousands fed with a meagre 5 loaves and two fishes.
In my reading for this sermon I came across a theological view I’d never heard before.
Rather than Jesus doing a miraculous multiplication of bread and fish, Jesus sharing the generosity of the young boy to inspire all to share what was in their bags and all were fed as a result.

To quote Myers the theologian who shared this view: ‘the only miracle here is the triumph of the economy of sharing within the context of a community of consumption.’
I love this.
It speaks of a Jesus who isn’t showing off his miraculous power but inspiring a change in each of us.
Making everyone more generous with those around them.
He’s helping us to create community through generosity -something that I think many of us would admit we don’t find easy.
The crowd is likely to have been a real diverse mix of Galilean society:
young, old, male, female, rich, poor, people born in Galilee, people not born in Galilee.
But all shared as equals.
It made me wonder:
Where in our lives could we eat alongside those who different from us?
I believe in this story as in many others Jesus is challenging us to seek out and be generous with those who challenge our view of the world, making us all more well-rounded and compassionate people.
We’re part of a culture built around consumption and forcing us to desire more and more, so never has this been more challenging.
Economist Grace Blakely said at Greenbelt that capitalism as a system is broken.
It’s a system based around gain for the rich and with the poorest paying the price, something we see reflected around the world today.
Unequal trade deals, tax havens, extreme weather hitting poor regions and some rich governments doing nothing – I could go on.
Since the financial crash Blakeley states in Britain the only people who are significantly wealthier are the wealthiest, so the average worker is no better off, the vulnerable are often far worse off due to government policy but the richest few are richer.
How different this is from the generosity of those listening to Jesus on the hill that day 2000 years ago.
One word really stands out to me in that story: all were ‘satisfied’ after the meal.
Not some were stuffed and some remained hungry but ALL were satisfied.
It speaks to us of a system running in a different way, on kingdoms economics rather than earthly economics.
This idea is reflected in 1 Corinthians where Paul chastises them for their Eucharist meals where some, the richer individuals in the party, are full and drunk while others leave the meal hungry.
This has implications for us. Where are we greedy and full, leaving others hungry?
Or do we ever feel that we’re leaving the table hungry?
Where in our lives, in our local communities, can we adopt a system of kingdom economics rather than earthly economics?
One way is as a consumer, as Christians partaking in the Eucharist we are contributing to this global system: where is our bread produced?
Who made the wine?

Gorringe has some strong words for us on this topic: ‘bread which takes from the poor for the consumption of the rich is not the bread of life but bread of death.
In that case our worship is not a Eucharist but idolatry and worship of mammon.’
His words do offer a significant challenge to me and force me to think not only about where my bread and wine come from, but also my veg, tea, coffee, clothes -I could go on.
I believe we’re called to understand our place in the world and in this complex capitalism system and do the best we can to create a more beautiful and equal world from where we are.
One of the reasons the Capitalist system is broken, says Blakeley, is due to climate change and the ecological disasters which are already happening, and are predicted to get worse.
She shared a terrifying message for the future but also her more hopeful view that through this disaster comes opportunity:
because powerful people are now seeing that the capitalism system is leading us to death and destruction and we NEED something different.
It’s no longer optional.
Many here I think would say “about time, and they really need to hurry up.”
With 100 councils declaring a climate emergency and much talk around the green new deal she suggested things are moving in the right direction.

I see a parallel with the child in the feeding of the 5,000 and the young people of today led by Greta Thunberg – the school strikes and their strong views on plastic.
I pray they are leading us to a better, fairer, greener future.
When I read back over this sermon I felt overwhelmed by our responsibility as consumers, campaigners, community members.
And I feared I was only contributing to the feelings of inadequacy many of us feel in the face of such overwhelming problems.
There simply isn’t enough time in the day, week, year or lifetime to make the difference we want in the world.
I believe God sees our intentions for good and even if we don’t hit the mark every time, when we buy something unethical or fail to invite our neighbour in for tea because we are tired, I believe there is always forgiveness and grace.
I leave you with this poem by Thomas Merton, which has relevance for us as individuals but also for our world:

My Lord God,
I have no idea where I am going.
I do not see the road ahead of me.
I cannot know for certain where it will end.
nor do I really know myself,
and the fact that I think I am following your will
does not mean that I am actually doing so.
But I believe that the desire to please you
does in fact please you.
And I hope I have that desire in all that I am doing.
I hope that I will never do anything apart from that desire.
And I know that if I do this you will lead me by the right road,
though I may know nothing about it.
Therefore will I trust you always though
I may seem to be lost and in the shadow of death.
I will not fear, for you are ever with me,
and you will never leave me to face my perils alone.


If you would like to find out more about this series then please visit Phil Gardner’s site.

This Week 14th – 20th October

October is Fair Trade Month
Mon 14 Oct 11am-3pm Rainbow Junktion Cafe
Tue 15 Oct @7:30-9pm Bible Study at church (0113 2297546 for further info)
Wed 16 Oct World Food Day #WorldFoodDay
Wed 16 Oct @12-2pm OWLS lunch
Thu 7 Oct 11am-3pm Rainbow Junktion Cafe
Fri 18 Oct 11am-3pm Rainbow Junktion Cafe
Fri 18 Oct @11:30am Bible Study at church (0113 2297546 for further info)
Fri 18 Oct @7pm Rainbow Junktion Bistro
Sat 19 Oct @11am Leeds Urban Harvest juicing workshop
Sun 20 Oct @10.30am Sunday morning worship – “Exploring the Eucharist“,  a series looking at the meaning and our experience of the Eucharist / Communion “Part 3 – The Open Table” – an an all-age shared worship meal centred on an informal Eucharist. Vegetarian food provided.
Sun 20 Oct @4pm Sacred Wing choir rehearsal

See our calendar for more details of what is happening at All Hallows’

Sunday 13th October 2019

We will be continuing our series on the eucharist this Sunday at 10:30am when Anna Bland will be sharing her thoughts about the eucharist as “Kingdom Economics”, a divine economy based on sharing, generosity and gift: “you give them something to eat” (Luke 9:13)

If you would like to find out more about this series then please visit Phil Gardner’s site.

This Week 7th – 13th October

October is Fair Trade Month
5-12 Oct
Good Money Week
Mon 7 Oct 11am-3pm
Rainbow Junktion Cafe
Tue 8 Oct @7:30-9pm Bible Study at church (0113 2297546 for further info)
Wed 9 Oct @12-2pm OWLS lunch
Thu 10 Oct 11am-3pm Rainbow Junktion Cafe
Fri 11 Oct 11am-3pm Rainbow Junktion Cafe
Fri 11 Oct 11am-1pm Knit and Natter at Rainbow Junktion Cafe
Fri 11 Oct @11:30am Bible Study at church (0113 2297546 for further info)
Sat 12 Oct @7:45pm Willy Porter Live at All Hallows with support from Stylusboy
Sun 13 Oct @10.30am Sunday morning worship – “Exploring the Eucharist“,  a series looking at the meaning and our experience of the Eucharist / Communion “Part 2 – Kingdom Economics”

See our calendar for more details of what is happening at All Hallows’